OUR IMPACT

D G E E

Dgee used a $60 loan from the Weaving Fund to purchase weaving cotton and a new specialized silk reed for her loom. With the cotton, Dgee has been weaving items that tourists who visit Sop Chem really enjoy, like bags, headbands, camera straps, and ponchos. Her new reed has replaced her older, damaged reed so she can continue weaving silk scarves at a quality she is proud to present. Dgee’s current goal for her business is to invest in a sewing machine that she can use to reduce the time it takes to sew skirts, bags, ponchos, camera straps, and headbands 10 times over. A sewing machine will also increase the quality and consistency of Dgee’s products and she can offer her sewing services to other weavers in Sop Chem. {Include a hyperlinked thing that says “Help Dgee reach her goal by shopping with us” linked to our shop }

S U H R

Baoh sponsored her daughter-in-law, Suhr, by taking out a $60 loan from the weaving fund in her name. She gave the loan to Suhr in September 2018, who at the time did not have a loom, the ability to weave, or any source of income to support her young family. Suhr used the loan to buy the raw materials essential to start weaving, cotton and silk, and a piece of necessary equipment for her loom, a reed. Over the next few months, Baoh worked with Suhr, teaching her how to weave with these new materials.
It turned out that Suhr has a natural talent for weaving, learning the trade very quickly. Currently, Baoh sells Suhr’s scarves in front of her shop to passing tourists because Suhr’s loom and home are located in the back of the village, out of sight of most visitors. Baoh has been selling Suhr’s scarves with great success, splitting the income 50/50 between the two artisans. With the help of the weaving fund and the kindness of her mother-in-law, Suhr has a found a source of independence and self-sufficiency in weaving and is excited for her future with the trade. She has been using her income from weaving to feed her family and to buy silverware, plates, and other household goods for her new home.

100% of our profits are reinvested into a microfinance weaving fund providing artisans access to financing to grow their small businesses and support their community.

 

These are the stories of how that fund has affected the lives of artisans.

P A E N G

Paeng was one of the first artisans to utilize the Weaving Fund created by our profits. She borrowed $120 to purchase the finest quality silk produced by silkworms. With this more expensive and finer silk, she is now weaving high quality traditional Lao skirts, which are very popular throughout the country. Paeng sells these skirts in Luang Prabang, a nearby city, for twice the value of the lower quality silk skirts she was previously weaving. Paeng has used her weaving skills and knowledge of local markets to double the income potential of her small weaving business with the financial resources provided by the Weaving Fund. Over the next year she plans to focus on weaving and selling many high quality worm-silk skirts to pay off her loan, support her 17-year-old son’s education, and continue to grow her business.

D G E E

Dgee borrowed $60 to purchase raw cotton and a new specialized silk reed for her loom. With the cotton, Dgee has been weaving items that tourists who visit Sop Chem enjoy, such as bags, headbands, camera straps, and ponchos. Her new reed has replaced her older, damaged reed so she can continue weaving silk scarves at a quality she is proud to present. Dgee’s current goal for her business is to invest in a sewing machine that she can use to reduce the time it takes to sew skirts, bags, ponchos, camera straps, and headbands 10 times over. A sewing machine will also increase the quality and consistency of her products and give Dgee the ability to offer her sewing services to other weavers in Sop Chem. 

S U H R  &  B A O H

Baoh sponsored her daughter-in-law, Suhr, by borrowing $60 in her name. She gave the loan to Suhr in September 2018, who at the time did not have a loom, the ability to weave, or any source of income to support her young family. Suhr used the loan to buy the raw materials essential to start weaving, cotton and silk, and a piece of necessary equipment for her loom, a reed. Over the next few months, Baoh worked with Suhr, teaching her how to weave with these new materials.

It turned out that Suhr has a natural talent for weaving and she was able to learn the trade very quickly. Currently, Baoh sells Suhr’s scarves in front of her shop to passing tourists because Suhr’s loom and home are located in the back of the village, out of sight of most visitors. Baoh has been selling Suhr’s scarves with great success, splitting the income 50/50 between the two artisans. With the help of the weaving fund and the kindness of her mother-in-law, Suhr has a found a source of independence and self-sufficiency in weaving; she is excited for her future with the trade. She has been using her income from weaving to feed her family and to buy silverware, plates, and other essential household goods for her new home.

Left: Suhr; Right: Baoh

V O A H N

Voahn borrowed $60 to purchase a new specialized reed for her loom that she now uses to weave large cotton blanket scarves, which is something she was not able to do before the fund, as well as 10-kg of cotton to weave them with. Voahn noticed how popular the cotton blanket scarves are in her local market and has adapted her business strategy to take advantage of this. She supports her four children through Primary School, Secondary School, High School, and University with the income she earns from weaving. After Voahn pays off her current loan, she plans to take out another loan from the to expand her silkworm operation to produce more high quality silk for herself and to sell to other artisans.

L I E N G

Like Voahn, Lieng borrowed $120 to purchase a new reed and raw cotton to weave large cotton blanket scarves. Each large cotton blanket scarf takes ten days to weave and you will rarely catch Lieng away from her loom as she works very hard to build up a large supply of these scarves to sell to tourists that visit Sop Chem in the summer and winter time.

N I T

Nit borrowed $60 to purchase a new reed and raw materials to weave large cotton blanket scarves. Nit is the owner of two looms and with her new reed, she now has one loom dedicated to large cotton scarves which she earns a high profit from and another for silk textiles. She can now quickly adapt to the market around her to take advantage of demand in nearby towns, cities, and that of visitors coming to her village. Nit supports herself, her husband, and two children with weaving. She has her entrepreneurial sights set on purchasing a more expensive high quality silk reed in the future which she will use to weave high quality worm-silk skirts.

P A I

Pai learned to weave from her mother in May of 2018 with the hopes of supporting herself, her husband, and her soon-to-be-born baby. At that time she had the skills to weave but lacked the resources to buy the materials she needed to start weaving on her own loom. When the Weaving Fund was created the following month, June of 2018, Pai took out $60 to cover the start-up costs of her loom (raw cotton, silk, and a special reed for weaving silk skirts). With the financing from the Weaving Fund, Pai now has a fully operational loom where she weaves and sells silk scarves and skirts to locals in nearby towns.

Help us create more stories like the ones above. Shop with us.

Connect with Us!

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

Join us in igniting the spark of progress. Let's connect!

0